Easy Ideas for Creating with Clear Glass Ornaments

Today I come to you with gorgeous ideas how to personalize your Christmas tree with DIY ornaments that you can make with your friends or family.

The Christmas ball ornaments are a must have on your Christmas tree. But have you ever thought to improve or to change the design of clear glass ornaments? With these 30 DIY ideas for clear glass ornaments, you can add lots of fun and creative effects to them and make the tree truly shine during the holidays. We’ve selected a few very beautiful DIY projects for you to try this year. Enjoy!

via 30 Creative Ideas for Decorating and Filling Clear Glass Ornaments

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Alcohol Ink Ornaments: These Are The Coolest And Prettiest Ever!

These are made with Ranger Alcohol Inks canned air and clear GLASS ornaments. Click the link below for the video that shows you how. This speaks to my love of color. After watching it, it seems pretty easy. I am going to try this, like I need something else to do, right!?

 

via Alcohol Ink Ornaments | LulaBelle Handicraftsalcohol-ink-ornament-2alcohol-ink-ornament

Santa Card Set

glue-dots-santa-christmas-card-set-merry-wishes-cardWater color and mixed media is all the rage now in the card making world and I included a little bit of it in this Santa card set. With the help of Glue Dots® adhesives, I was able to use different paper mediums to complete the cards.

Made by: Grace Tolman
Time: Approximately 45 minutes
Level: Beginner
Size: 3 cards that is 4 ¼ x 5 ½”

Here’s what you need:

Glue Dots® Premium Permanent GlueTape™
Glue Dots® Pop Up Dots™ (optional)
Cardstock- (white) Neenah 90 lb.; (black) Die Cuts With a View
Pattern papers- Christmas, Recollections
Watercolor paper- Royal Langnickel
Stamp set- Hohoho, Technique Tuesday
Black Ink
Watercolor set
Embossing powder
Circle Cutter
Pearl pen
Glimmer paste
Scissors

Here’s what you do:

Create the card bases using white cardstock.

Stamp the “Santa” image on watercolor paper. Color with watercolor paint and set aside to dry. Cut out the image.

Add some glitter paste onto the Santa images and set aside to dry.

Cut three papers measuring 4 x 5 ¼”. Cut out three 3” circles from paper. Cut 3, 2″ strips of paper.

Stamp the sentiment onto black cardstock using Versamark ink. Heat emboss them using white powder.

Put together the cards. Layer the circles on the right side for two of the cards. Adhere to the pattern paper block using Premium Permanent GlueTape.

Adhere the paper strips onto the left side of the card using Premium Permanent GlueTape. Trim off the excess.

Cut a pennant shape on the bottom of the sentiment black piece and adhere to the top of the paper strip panel. Use Premium Permanent GlueTape adhesive to adhere it in place.

For the third card, place the circle on the center of the big paper block. Place the 2″ paper strip on the bottom of the circle. Layer the sentiment on top of the horizontal paper strip. Adhere everything with Premium Permanent GlueTape.

Adhere all of the layered card panels on the white cards using Premium Permanent GlueTape.

Adhere the Santa images onto the cards using Pop Up Dots for added dimension if desired.

Add some more details to the cards using some pearl pens.

via Santa Card Set

Trade Cards: An Illustrated History – Home

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Something I’ve never heard of. Sports trading cards, yes. Advertising? No. These are quite pretty and advertise everything from beer to bread to root beer.

Trade Cards: An Illustrated History features highlights from the Waxman Collection of Food and Culinary Trade Cards–a remarkable assemblage of advertising trade cards about food and related subjects ca. 1870-1900. Trade cards provide a surprisingly revealing look at America during a period of growth and national pride, set against the nineteenth century’s unshakable faith in perpetual civic and individual self-improvement.This online exhibition provides an illustrated overview of the history of trade cards, while exploring the ways in which they illuminate late-nineteenth-century American life, culture, fashion, society, and identity. Written by Nach (1958) and Maron Waxman.

Source: Trade Cards: An Illustrated History – Home